Event of Note: Queer Feminisms Writing Workshop

Kohl, a feminist journal with a focus on gender and sexuality in West Asia, South West Asia, and North Africa, has opened its call for applications towards its 2019 Queer Feminisms Writing Workshop.

The workshop will be held over five days between November 29 and December 3 in Lebanon, and will work towards their June 2020 issue.

During the workshop, participants will reflect on how queer feminisms have been conceptualised and experienced in Arabic-speaking societies, both in and beyond the region. Framing the discourse will be questions such as,

What are queer feminisms? How do we theorize them away from western/white articulations? How have queer politics that are intersectional taken root and manifested in our movements’ praxis? What are the queer feminist fault lines we encounter? What political projects are we envisioning and want to see materialize, and what mechanisms do we put in place for ourselves and each other?

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The deadline for applications is August 11; for more details on the submission and eligibility, visit their call, here.

Gender and Drone Warfare

One for the bookshelf, Gender and Drone Warfare: A Hauntological Perspective by Lindsay C. Clark (2019), draws on interviews with British reaper drone crews to gauge how killing with drones complicates how we understand masculinity and femininity during wars.

In particular, her work considers how,

As their role does not include physical risk, drone crews have been critiqued for failing to meet the masculine requirements necessary to be considered ‘warriors’ and have been derided for feminising war. However, this book argues that drone warfare, and the experiences of the crews, exceeds the traditional masculine/feminine binary and suggests a new approach to explore this issue.

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For more on gender and drone warfare, Martine Heijthuyzen’s ‘Gendering Drone Warfare‘ provides a quick read at the Centre for Feminist Foreign Policy (CFFP), and Cerelia Athanassiou’s 2012 article, ”Gutsy’ Decisions and Passive Processes: The Warrior Decision-Maker after the Global War on Terror’ looks at the context of masculinity and the re-emergence of the GWOT ‘war machine’.